Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Morning Edition: Good Stories on Brooklyn Museum and College

Came across two interesting items on the web this morning. The Wall Street Journal, with its spiffy new Greater New York section, has a story today detailing how Brooklyn College has recently become home to the premiere boxing archive in the country. Hank Kaplan, originally from Williamsburg, died in 2007, willing the collection of boxing material he had been hoarding his whole life to the college.

In addition to a "mountain of news clippings," Kaplan's trove covers "American and British fighters between 1890 through 2007...Along the way, he also amassed 2,600 books on boxing, roughly 500,000 photographic prints and negatives, 1,200 posters—many signed by some of the most prominent boxers in history—correspondence, memorabilia, scrapbooks and more materials, all chronicling the ethnicities, rivalries, lives, triumphs and deaths of thousands of fighters, famous, infamous and unknown."

Kaplan's collection "has attracted a stream of other donations from relatives of prominent historical boxing figures" to Brooklyn College. And the National Endowment for the Humanities recently awarded them a grant of $300,000 to process the materials.

Brooklyn College: Boxing Mecca [Wall Street Journal]


Brownstoner's Montrose Morris has another great history post this morning, this one about the Brooklyn Institute, the precursor organization to the Brooklyn Museum. The institute was sort of an umbrella organization over dozens of different learning societies in Brooklyn. This post focuses on the Architectural Department of the Brooklyn Institute. Future posts are promised. It's worth clicking on just to see a picture of the original architectural plan for the Brooklyn Museum on Eastern Parkway. As it stands today, it's only a fourth the size as it was intended. It would have been a monster!

Walkabout: the Great Gathering, part1 [Brownstoner]

1 comment:

Brenda from Flatbush said...

Just found your blog and linked to you--nice work! My problem is, there are too many good Brooklyn blogs and too little time...